Hormone Therapy

Hormone therapy is sometimes used after surgery to decrease the change of the cancer returning or after it has already spread to shrink and contain it. This therapy is recommended for women who have a type of breast cancer that is sensitive to hormones—estrogen receptor positive (ER positive) and progesterone receptor positive (PR positive ) cancers. There are three primary ways to block hormones:

Medicines that block hormones from attaching to cells: Tamoxifen is the most commonly used drug to block estrogen from attaching to an estrogen receptor in cancer cells, which slows the growth and can kill cancer cells. This drug can be used in both pre- and post-menopausal women.

Side Effects

  • Fatigue
  • Hot flashes
  • Night sweats
  • Vaginal dryness
  • Cataracts
  • Blood clots
  • Stroke
  • Uterine cancer

Medicines that stop the production of estrogen after menopause, such as a group of drugs called aromatase inhibitors that block the action of an enzyme that converts androgens in the body to estrogen.

Side Effects

  • Joint and muscle pain
  • Bone thinning or osteoporosis

Medicines or surgery that stops hormone production in the ovaries for premenopausal women. Additionally some women can have surgery in the form of prophylactic oophorectomy to surgically stop hormone production.

Spotlight

After surviving cancer, women look for a community of support and guidance. In a video produced by the Society of Gynecologic Oncology, survivors share how they live and thrive after endometrial cancer. As described by one survivor, “You can get better.”  

Awareness

September is Gynecologic Cancer Awareness Month.  After creating the month in 1999, the Foundation strives to bring attention about these cancers through public awareness campaigns.

Research

The Foundation is proud to offer various Research Grants and Awards. Click here for more information.

Education

FREE Gynecologic Cancer Survivors Courses throughout the country. For more information, click here.