Treatment

You and your family have learned of a diagnosis of ovarian cancer. The amount of information you receive at the time of diagnosis can feel overwhelming. All at once, you may feel there are questions to be answered, decisions to be made and so much information to be understood.

Ovarian cancer is most often treated with surgery and chemotherapy. Only rarely is radiation therapy used. It is important to distinguish the stage, grade and subtype of ovarian cancer because the treatment approaches may be different.

Your specific treatment plan will depend on several factors, including:

  • The stage and grade of your cancer
  • Pathology (subtype) of your cancer
  • Your age and general health

All treatments for ovarian cancer have side effects. Most side effects can be managed or avoided. Treatments may affect unexpected parts of your life including your function at work, home, intimate relationships, and deeply personal thoughts and feelings.

Before beginning treatment, it is important to learn about the possible side effects, and talk with your treatment team members about your feelings or concerns. They can prepare you for what to expect and tell you which side effects should be reported to them immediately. They can also help you find ways to manage the side effects you experience.

Spotlight

Hear from Dr. Anil Sood, the Foundation’s Research Chairman, and Carol Brown, 2014 SGO Program Chair, about research of interest to women and the public presented at the 2014 SGO Annual Meeting on Women’s Cancer. Watch the video

Awareness

A new SGO Clinical Practice Statement states women diagnosed with epithelial ovarian, tubal, and peritoneal cancers should be considered for genetic counseling and testing, even in the absence of a family history.

Education

The next Gynecologic Cancer Survivors Course Friday, May 2, 2014 in Long Island, NY. For more information on courses, click here.