Once You Have Been Treated, Then What?

The frequency of exams, imaging, and blood tests varies due to many factors, but typically you will be followed every 3 to 6 months for the first 2 years with at least an examination of the vagina and rectal examination to hope to detect recurrences early at the most curable stage. These examinations will occur less frequently thereafter. In addition, imaging studies such as x-rays, CT scans or MRIs may be periodically performed, especially if you have any new pains or symptoms. The top of the vagina is the most common site of recurrent endometrial cancer and patients will typically present with vaginal bleeding.

Spotlight

Hear from Dr. Anil Sood, the Foundation’s Research Chairman, and Carol Brown, 2014 SGO Program Chair, about research of interest to women and the public presented at the 2014 SGO Annual Meeting on Women’s Cancer. Watch the video

Awareness

A new SGO Clinical Practice Statement states women diagnosed with epithelial ovarian, tubal, and peritoneal cancers should be considered for genetic counseling and testing, even in the absence of a family history.

Education

The next Gynecologic Cancer Survivors Course Friday, May 2, 2014 in Long Island, NY. For more information on courses, click here.